How she creates her art....

Watercolor, I really enjoy working outside, "en plein air”, with transparent watercolor. I always hope to communicate, on paper, the feelings, the sounds, the temperatures, the emotions of viewing nature in all her glory as I paint. I find it most helpful to sketch before beginning a painting, as it makes me study the scene or object with a critical and thorough eye. I want to “know” my subject—the bark on the tree, the movement of the waves. Then I evaluate and adjust the design to make a pleasing composition, and then do a “value study”—where I want the darks and lights to be emphasized. Sunlight moves, clouds come in, and I must know what intrigued me to the scene in the first place. I also paint from photographs, but like to study several views of the scene, do my sketches, then put them away so as to not be influenced by “photo clutter”—things that may not add to the composition or design. Then, I get to have the thrill of putting paint to paper, and watch it go—having started with a plan.


Watermedia is also such a thrill! But the approach is the opposite of watercolor. Watermedia is an approach that allows total freedom with using different grounds (gesso, gel, etc) and real freedom of painting beginning layers, etc. Watermedia is titled that because you can utilize all types of watersoluable paints, watercolor crayon, pencils, inks, etc. The layering process is fabulous—you can put down paint, wipe some off, texture using alcohol, plastic wrap, let dry and begin again. As you work, images develop that you may want to keep, or keep layering. Most of this inspiration comes, for me, from my experiences, influences from travels and different cultures’ , “dream sequence”, or “gut reaction” to events, books, and ideas. So the planning part of this type of painting is at the end—when you “pull it all together”.